obstacles don’t have to stop you

I read a review on the documentary Marathon Challenge last week and decided I had to watch it for myself.

The movie brought me back to my “No Excuses” post. It starts by choosing 13 participants from all different backgrounds to see if they can run the Boston Marathon. There were a few team members that really inspired me:

  • Betsey Powers started the process 70 pounds overweight. She had a traumatic experience a few years before and had gone through a divorce so really needed something to get her moving. Within a few weeks, she lost 45 pounds and became the fastest female runner on the team.
  • Larry Haydu suffered from a heart attack while shoveling snow one winter. He then became active to try to maintain a healthy heart, but started to slow down. When training, he expressed concern (along with his family and doctor) about running outdoors in the cold. I complain about not wanting to run in the cold, but I have no bad memories to haunt me. Great guy.
  • Daniel Williams had been HIV positive for 13 years at the time of filming. He decided to join Team NOVA to prove that the virus does not have to get in the way of having a healthy, active life. His passion for life really amazed me.
  • Of course, Uta Pippig, was an inspiration. As a coach for the team and a marathon champion, she really was able to get the team moving. I can only hope to reach her level someday!

Anyone who thinks they can’t run a marathon (or any race) should watch this film. It was so great to watch Team NOVA reach the finish line; it really gets you thinking that all you need is dedication and motivation.

Check it out! I rented it from my local library, but for more information, visit their site: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/body/marathon-challenge.html.

How about you? Have you had any major challenges/obstacles that you had to overcome that helped motivate you to start running?

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10 responses to “obstacles don’t have to stop you

  1. Just found your blog and wanted to say good luck, good luck, good luck! Both with your Boston training and fundraising. It’s fantastic that you’ve started early, and I’m certain you’ll be able to smash your $4000 goal. I ran Boston for the pediatric cystic fibrosis clinic in 2010, and I truly think charity runners almost have it harder than those who qualify for Boston. You train for the marathon, but at the same time have a dual goal of fundraising that takes up so much time and mental energy. It’s all worth it, of course! “Spirit of the Marathon” is another motivational movie, and it’s available for free on Hulu. I watched it a lot while I was training in 2010. Good luck again, with the training and the fundraising; I’m sure you’re going to be awesome!

    • Thanks Beth! Your enthusiasm is great, makes me feel so much better! That’s awesome to hear from an experience charity runner. I will also add Spirit of the Marathon to my Hulu queue, thanks for the recommendation.

  2. Have you watched ‘Spirit of the Marathon’? If you haven’t I highly recommend it. I have watched it 4 times now. My challenge is getting out there when it’s cold. Winters in Nebraska were not my favorite time of year, so when it gets just a little cold I want to run and hid under a mound of blankets.

  3. I started to run because my doctor told me I never would. I had reconstructive foot surgery following a car accident, and he said once it healed, I could do anything I want but run. At the time I was 205 lbs, the furthest thing from an athlete, but hearing I could “never” do something lit a fire in me. Four years later, 65 lbs lighter, I completed the full Denver Rock & Roll Marathon 3 weeks ago!!!! Marathon Challenge and Spirit of the Marathon helped inspire me during my training and keep me going! Good luck to you on your racing! :) :) :) :) Knock ’em dead!

    • Wow! That is totally amazing. It’s true, every time I’ve said I could “never” do something, it has happened. I have completely dropped that word from my vocabulary. Thanks for your kind words, I really am impressed with your ability to overcome something so severe.

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